The Department of Homeland Security plans to build a high-risk virus research center in the heart of America

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is set to begin construction on a new high-risk bio-weapons research facility on the campus of Kansas State University in Manhattan, though critics say the decision is fraught with risk because of the potential for damage from nearby earthquake fault lines.
In a statement on its Web site, DHS said it needs the new facility to replace an aging one located at Greenport, N.Y. That facility, known as the Plum Island Animal Disease Center, has been in operation since 1954 and is nearing the end of its useful life.
According to the department, $54 million has been approved for the construction of the proposed National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility. The new facility will feature research on biolevel 3 and 4 viruses – some without any known cures – and other potentially dangerous materials, though department officials have downplayed any potential threats.
The problem, critics say, is the location and the inherent seismic and weather-related disasters that could befall the facility, wreaking havoc on the surrounding population and beyond – issues the government seems to be downplaying.
Painting lipstick on a pig
“The United States works on the frontline of livestock animal health research to defend against foreign animal, emerging, and zoonotic diseases that could threaten the U.S. livestock industry, food supply, and public health,” says Homeland Security Under Secretary for Science and Technology Tara O’Toole, in a departmental risk assessment posted online. “To address congressional requirements, this detailed, updated risk assessment reaffirms that we can build a safe and secure facility to meet this important mission.”
The department contends that, according to its risk analysis, “calculated risks have been significantly reduced by incorporating mitigation measures into the risk assessment and updating the analysis to allow for a cumulative risk calculation.”
In other words, DHS says it is prepared to adopt a facility design that includes “significant changes beyond the industry standard to reduce risk.” Reducing risk isn’t, of course, the same as eliminating it.
‘Groundbreaking’ facility?
All of this babble is, of course, designed to make us feel better about having a plant that conducts research on incurable viruses located smack dab in the middle of a volatile region of the country. What the department isn’t saying is that the part of Kansas being considered for this new facility is prone to a number of natural disasters and occurrences, each of which could cause considerable damage.
“Manhattan, Kansas, faces a number of worrisome hazards that should influence the architecture and construction of the BSL-4 laboratory. These hazards include flooding, dam failure, earthquakes, and tornadoes,” says an assessment by the Suburban Emergency Management Project (SEMP), located in Chicago.
The last time the region suffered major flood damage was in 1951, but, SEMP notes, the area is still in a flood plain and, given the record floods last summer in neighboring Missouri, the potential for disaster is there.
Also, SEMP notes that while “Kansas is not widely known as seismically active,” it “boasts the Humboldt fault zone, which underlies Turtle Creek dam and Manhattan,” a region the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has deemed a “localized seismic hot spot.”
“An estimated maximum earthquake magnitude of 6.6 could occur in the area of the Tuttle Creek dam, causing liquefaction of the foundation sand beneath the dam, large deformations of the dam, and dam failure,” said SEMP’s assessment of the proposed new biodefense facility. “The consequences of a breach of the Tuttle Creek dam include rushing water at 381,000 cubic feet/second (six times the rate in 1993) moving toward a population at risk of 13,000 people.”
In addition, the area is known for its tornadoes. According to the Oklahoma Climatological Survey, the region in and around the proposed site features an average of five to seven tornadoes a year.
“Riley County, Kansas, home to Manhattan, is well known for tornado touchdowns. For example, on June 11, 2008, Manhattan sustained extensive damages but no injuries when an F4 nighttime tornado ripped through it,” said the SEMP assessment.
Sources for this article include:

Recover from ADD, ADHD, and depression without drugs

Saturday, March 17, 2012 by: Allison Biggar
Chances are you’ve been prescribed antidepressants or know someone who has. According to the Centers for Disease Control, eleven percent of Americans over the age of 12 take antidepressants. Between 1996 and 2005 alone, the number of people taking antidepressants doubled to 27 million.
Concurrent with this pharmaceutical boom, we have also seen the rise of the ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) diagnosis. According to the National Institute of Mental health, 3 to 5 percentof kids have ADHD, but some experts believe that figure could be as high as 10 percent. Yet there are no lab tests to confirm ADHD in children or adults. Instead, doctors rely on the patient’s response to questions, the family’s description of behavior problems and a school assessment. Once a diagnosis has been made and the patient is put on ADHD medication, the medications usually have troubling side effects. Those may include headaches, upset stomach, dizziness, toxic psychosis and even death, among others.
Many individuals are reporting that diagnoses for depression and ADHD – along with their attendant pharmaceutical treatments – are being handed out like candy. “I don’t think you can make a diagnosis of depression in a 10-minute doctor visit, you just can’t,” said Dr. James Parker, a child psychiatrist at Group Health Cooperative in Seattle. Frank Barnhill, M.D. is a family physician and author of “Mistaken for ADHD”. He writes, “Insurance companies often try to squeeze the last penny of profit out of medical care and push doctors even harder to provide that care in less time and for lower costs.”
Kerri Kasem knows this experience personally. The radio host was battling depression in her early 20s when she sought medical attention for it. “I’d get really high highs and really low lows,” she says. “The doctors wanted to put me on drugs. I walked into an office and 20 minutes later, with him asking me just a couple questions, he told me I had ADD and he gave me Ritalin. He didn’t ask me if I had any food allergies or ‘What’s your diet like?’ There was not one question about my health.”
Trusting his advice, she began taking Ritalin, but “at the end of one week, I was so sick that I gave him back his drugs… I felt ill.” Kasem decided to have her blood tested and learned she had some pressing nutritional issues. “I was very low on iron, I didn’t have enough vitamin D. I had all these deficiencies. So I started taking supplements. I got off the sugar completely and that included all the pastas and breads. All of a sudden, my brain started working a little better.”
She started taking supplements for the brain and noticed a marked improvement in her ability to focus. “My head was like a calculator; I was quick on my feet. I never had that before.” This prompted her to research possible food allergies, and she discovered that she was allergic to gluten. After eliminating gluten, her thinking became even clearer. These changes proved to be a professional game changer for her too. “I can do radio!” she realized. “I wanted to do talk radio more than anything. It was something I wanted to do but I never thought I could.” With her new focus, Kasem began interning at radio stations and taking classes. She’s now been doing radio since 1997, and you can hear her on the K-pod and Sixx Sense. She is a wellness advocate who promotes natural approaches to disease such as juicing, and eating a plant-based diet. Kasem reflects, “There’s always another option, despite what the doctors say.”
Sources for this article include:

About the author: Allison Biggar is a writer and filmmaker who believes in using the media to empower people to make a difference. Currently, she is directing a documentary on people who have cured themselves of disease naturally without drugs, surgery, chemotherapy or radiation.
For more stories, videos, and articles about nutrition, weight-loss, and healing naturally without drugs, please visit Holistic Voice at http://www.holisticvoice.org.

Seven reasons to eat more dark chocolate

More and more health reasons for eating dark chocolate keep coming in. Many will be pointed out here, then explained further in the sources indicated by numbers in parenthesis. But first, understand that organic dark chocolate brought into the market place under fair trade agreements is best.
Some of the major cheap chocolate producers use child slaves in Africa to pick cacao. The more dark the chocolate with less sugar, milk, and other ingredients, the closer it is to cacao. A range of at least 70% to 90% cacao in dark chocolate is both tasty and healthy.
Milk chocolate contains milk, which negates the health benefits, and sugar, which feeds cancer cells. Avoid it.
According to Dr. Debra Miller’s statement in Chemistry Central Journal , “Cacao seeds are a ‘Super Fruit’ providing nutritive value beyond that of their macronutrient composition.” (1)
Interestingly, one doesn’t have to gorge lots of chocolate every day to get the health benefits. A little treat, like a square or two daily will support good health.
A study of almost 20,000 participants in Germany concluded that those who ate 7.5 grams of dark chocolate a day received most of the heart protection benefits of chocolate. Organic dark chocolate bars are usually 100 grams. (1)

Benefits of dark chocolate

Cardiac and stroke protection : Dark chocolate lowers blood pressure, which lowers risks of heart attacks and strokes. (1)

Reduces risk of colon cancer : Cocoa polyphenols from dark chocolate reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. This was determined in a study by the Science and Technology Institute of Food and Nutrition in Spain, which was published in the journal Molecular Nutrition. (2)
Healthy fats :The fat in chocolate does little to raise cholesterol. It contains abundant oleic acid, the type of fatty acid found in olive oil, which helps prevent heart disease and promote antioxidant activity. (3)
Enhances glucose metabolism : Dark chocolate (70% plus) candy bars inhibit blood sugar issues to help prevent diabetes and obesity. How’s that for a surprise! (3)
Improves mood : Studies have shown that dark chocolate contains serotonin and increases endorphin production. It’s a natural anti-depressant. (4)
Improves brain function : Nottingham University professor Ian MacDonald used MRI analysis to determine improved brain activity with people who had just consumed cocoa drinks. (4) Hopefully they didn’t have to undergo too many MRI scans that would fry their brains!

Eases PMS issues : Here’s a hint for husbands and boyfriends to give dark chocolate to your wives and lady friends. (5)
There you have it: many reasons to enjoy organic dark chocolate that is at least 70% cacao. There are brands with 80% to 90% as well. These aren’t your kiddy chocolates with lots of sugar or milk or creamy nugget fillings, etc. They are semi-sweet at best.
The more bitter the better. It’s not difficult to get used to if you really like chocolate. Enjoy chocolate with the knowledge that it’s actually good for you.

Sources for this article include:
(1) http://www.naturalnews.com/031959_dark_chocolate_antioxidants.html
(2) http://www.naturalnews.com
(3) http://greenqueen.wordpress.com
(4) http://www.laurelonhealthfood.com
(5) http://www.ecomii.com